Tag Archives: Oracle Cloud

Why Does Oracle Exist?

At an Oracle Partner event this week in Croatia, I got the latest updates on Oracle’s products. And it hit me that nobody, not even Oracle, understands why the company exists.

I looked at their website but was unable to find a mission statement or discern any coherent vision. It seems Oracle exists simply because it does.

Back in their database days, they wanted to manage all the world’s information. But in their current incarnation, their vision more cloudy than cloud.

Why on earth does an enterprise software company like Oracle dabble in chatbots? Why are they building an IFTTT clone? Why are they running “Oracle Code” events and talking about everything but Oracle software? Why are they coming from a sub-one-percent IaaS market share and announcing their intention to rule the IaaS world?

What Oracle should do is:

  • Build on their strength in SaaS. I believe they are on track to living up to Mark Hurd’s vision of being one of the two SaaS vendors  with 80% of the market (and no, SAP won’t be the other one)
  • Provide PaaS trials limited in power, but not in time. Nobody can figure out how to use Oracle PaaS offerings in meager 30-day trials
  • Concentrate on real differentiators like Application Builder Cloud Service (and stop trying to provide their version of every cloud service in the universe).

Oracle is a great software engineering company. I hope they figure out why they exist.

Oracle Stock Rises on Cloud Surprise

Stockbrokers were taken by surprise by Oracle’s Cloud revenue when Oracle announced quarterly results last week, and Oracle stock duly jumped by seven percent. It has fallen back somewhat since but is still up three percent.

ORCL

(source: Yahoo Finance)

Oracle Cloud revenue is up by 63% and now makes up 13% of Oracle’s $9.3 billion quarterly revenue. It is not clear how much of this is the “cloud credits” that is reportedly bundled into renewal and new on-premise deals. It will be interesting to see if customers find a good use for these credits and will buy more once they are used up.

As an ERP and database company, it would make the most sense for Oracle to push their strong SaaS and PaaS offerings. SaaS and PaaS currently make up 85% of Oracle cloud revenue, but they have decided to try to muscle into the already-crowded market for commodity computing services. With $195 million of IaaS revenue, it doesn’t make much sense for Oracle to try to catch up to Amazon’s $3.5 billion.

Inconvenient Cloud Truth

Oracle has just announced that they are discontinuing the main benefit of participating in the Oracle ACE program at the highest level: The annual briefing at Oracle HQ before the OpenWorld conference. Together with previous cuts in travel funding, this leaves the program as little more than a logo to put on your website.

Before cloud, Oracle was a big player in on-premise enterprise software. They made very good software, so it made sense to cover the cost of flying independent experts to Oracle HQ for briefings on the latest software. Having armed the experts with the latest knowledge and software, it also made sense for Oracle to pay their travel costs as they went out into the world and advocated it.

Today, Oracle is struggling to pivot towards being a cloud vendor. The independent experts are saying straight up that most of their cloud services aren’t very good yet, so Oracle is not getting any return on its investment in the ACE Directors.

I’ve been happy working with Oracle in my ten years as an Oracle ACE Director, and sincerely hope they become successful in the cloud. Once they are, it will make sense for them to restore funding for the ACE Director program. But right now, the cuts make sense.

Is Cloud a Priority at Oracle?

This is the Oracle Cloud:

screen-shot-2016-11-10-at-08-57-29

What do you think happens when you click on “Account Details”? This:

screen-shot-2016-11-10-at-08-55-15

This experience and many others make me wonder if Cloud is truly a priority at Oracle. There is obviously no automated availability testing taking place, and some of my other Oracle Cloud experience has not left me terribly impressed.

This is the company that brought us the gold standard in relational databases, for crying out loud! You can do better, Oracle. Please, please start trying.

Oracle Cloud: Credit Where It’s Due

I’ve had interesting discussions with people inside and outside Oracle after sharing my experience with some of the Cloud trial services.

In the interest of fairness, I want to state that the DB Schema Service seems to be the outlier in poor customer service. Since my last Cloud post, Oracle has improved the service slightly. Instead of terminating it completely without warning, they now send me a mail at 7 pm that my service will disappear in less than a day, and then another one at 3 am saying that it’s now gone. So the inattentive developer will still leave the office at 5 pm happy to be running an Oracle Cloud service, and arrive the next morning to find it gone.

Other Oracle Cloud services are better – for my currently running Application Builder Cloud Service trial, I just got a reasonable warning that it will expire in 9 days.